15 May 1992[6]	3	1, 2, 3	2, 3	3.0, 3.1 (preferred)	Included Corel Photo-Paint asp ( for bitmap editing), CorelSHOW (for creating on-screen presentations), CorelCHART (for graphic charts), Mosaic and CorelTRACE (for vectorizing bitmaps). The inclusion of this software was the precedent for the actual graphic suites.[7] CorelDraw for Unix also became available.[8][9] The fonts bundled with CorelDraw are no longer in the proprietary Corel format WFN, but in Type 1 PostScript fonts and TTF TrueType formats.

20 Mar 2012[26] X6 (16) 7 to X6 7 to X6 XP (32-bit only), Vista, 7, 8 Includes 64-bit and multi-core processor native support, support for 64-bit Adobe Photoshop plugins, and additional tools to import and export from Adobe Creative Suite and Publisher. Object properties, styles, and color styling have each been consolidated into their own docking toolbars. A new Unicode OpenType-based text engine modernizes text handling, including full international language support (the legacy text mode is retained). Dynamic alignment guides allow for easy repositioning without setting static guidelines. CorelConnect content organizer allows for in-application access to online sources such as Flickr for assets such as images and clip art. New tools permit manipulating vector images by pushing, pulling, smearing, etc. Various improvements in frame-based layout, masking, clipping and effects have been made.[27]
No support. Even if you pay they are not really capable of helping with major bugs in the software nor recuperating files that gets corrupted by the regular crashs of the software. Great software if you are only doing minimal projects. When a certain level of complexity is reached in the project files, the software becomes very unstable and the probability of loosing files is very high.
Complex script rendering: InDesign supports Unicode character encoding, with Middle East editions supporting complex text layout for Arabic and Hebrew types of complex script. The underlying Arabic and Hebrew support is present in the Western editions of InDesign CS4, CS5, CS5.5 and CS6, but the user interface is not exposed, so it is difficult to access.
15 May 1992[6] 3 1, 2, 3 2, 3 3.0, 3.1 (preferred) Included Corel Photo-Paint asp ( for bitmap editing), CorelSHOW (for creating on-screen presentations), CorelCHART (for graphic charts), Mosaic and CorelTRACE (for vectorizing bitmaps). The inclusion of this software was the precedent for the actual graphic suites.[7] CorelDraw for Unix also became available.[8][9] The fonts bundled with CorelDraw are no longer in the proprietary Corel format WFN, but in Type 1 PostScript fonts and TTF TrueType formats.
Publisher is included in higher-end editions of Microsoft Office, reflecting Microsoft's emphasis on the application as an easy-to-use and less expensive alternative to the "heavyweights" with a focus on the small-business market, where firms do not have dedicated design professionals available to make marketing materials and other documents.[3][4] However, it has a relatively small share of the desktop publishing market, which is dominated by Adobe InDesign and formerly by QuarkXPress.[3]
Indices: Allows creating of a simple keyword index or a somewhat more detailed index of the information in the text using embedded indexing codes. Unlike more sophisticated programs, InDesign is incapable of inserting character style information as part of an index entry (e.g., when indexing book, journal or movie titles). Indices are limited to four levels (top level and three sub-levels). Like tables of contents, indices can be sorted according to the selected language.
Later versions of the software introduced new file formats. To support the new features, especially typographic, introduced with InDesign CS, both the program and its document format are not backward-compatible. Instead, InDesign CS2 introduced the INX (.inx) format, an XML-based document representation, to allow backwards compatibility with future versions. InDesign CS versions updated with the 3.1 April 2005 update can read InDesign CS2-saved files exported to the .inx format. The InDesign Interchange format does not support versions earlier than InDesign CS. With InDesign CS4, Adobe replaced INX with InDesign Markup Language (IDML), another XML-based document representation.[4]
InDesign is the successor to Adobe PageMaker, which was acquired by Adobe with the purchase of Aldus in late 1994. (Freehand, a competitor to Adobe Illustrator and also made by Aldus, was sold to Altsys, the maker of Fontographer.) By 1998 PageMaker had lost almost the entire professional market to the comparatively feature-rich QuarkXPress 3.3, released in 1992, and 4.0, released in 1996. Quark stated its intention to buy out Adobe[3] and to divest the combined company of PageMaker to avoid anti-trust issues.
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