8 Oct 1996[13] 7 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 5, 6, 7 95, NT 4 Context-sensitive Property bar, Print Preview with Zoom and Pan options, Scrapbook (for viewing a drag-and-dropping graphic objects), Publish to HTML option, Draft and Enhanced display options, Interactive Fill and Blend tools, Transparency tools, Natural Pen tool, Find & Replace wizard, Convert Vector to Bitmap option (inside Draw), Spell checker, Thesaurus and Grammar checker. The suite included Corel Scan and Corel Barista (a Java-based document exchange format).
24 Aug 1995[12] 6 3, 4, 5, 6 5, 6 95 This is the first version which was made exclusively for 32-bit Windows. New features were customizable interface, Polygon, Spiral, Knife and Eraser tools. Corel Memo, Corel Presents, Corel Motion 3D, Corel Depth, Corel Multimedia Manager, Corel Font Master and Corel DREAM (for 3D modelling) were included in the suite.
In 1987, Corel engineers Michel Bouillon and Pat Beirne undertook to develop a vector-based illustration program to bundle with their desktop publishing systems. That program, CorelDraw, was initially released in 1989. CorelDraw 1.x and 2.x ran under Windows 2.x and 3.0. CorelDraw 3.0 came into its own with Microsoft's release of Windows 3.1. The inclusion of TrueType in Windows 3.1 transformed CorelDraw into a serious illustration program capable of using system-installed outline fonts without requiring third-party software such as Adobe Type Manager; paired with a photo-editing program (Corel Photo-Paint), a font manager and several other pieces of software, it was also part of the first all-in-one graphics suite.
CorelDraw X7 finds a nice balance between the full professional suite and the standard image editor. By offering its usual massive set of tools alongside X7's additional functions, CorelDraw can offer something for everyone, regardless of their skill level. With a friendly, modern UI, comfortable workspaces, and a flexible licensing model, the suite is more usable and affordable than ever. Future add-ons promise users a mobile pattern creator tool for iOS 7 and the ability to browse patterns and fills on the go with a Windows 8 app. Lack of support means that Mac users are left out for now. However, CorelDraw's robustness as an illustrator app may tempt users to give it try, especially at its cheaper rate.
Microsoft Word 2007's document types, interface, and some features--very nearly every aspect of this word processor--have changed. With this update, Microsoft Word 2007 becomes a more image-conscious application. New picture-editing tools help you deck out documents and play with fancy fonts. Bloggers and researchers may also benefit. It's easier to get a handle on document security, but those who only need basic typing features may not want to relearn the interface or deal with the new file formats.
Creativity comes easy with CorelDRAW Home & Student Suite 2019, your go-to design software for graphics, layout, and photo editing—at home or for school. Create greeting cards, calendars, photo projects, social media images—and whatever else you can imagine—in a friendly environment with intuitive tools. With tips, tricks and tutorials close at hand to guide you, you can tackle any project for results you’ll be proud to share. Get started painlessly with new creative templates and an interface that’s quick to navigate. Manage design elements, layers and pages with ease, thanks to the new Objects docker that takes the hassle out of identifying and pinpointing your design elements. It's easy to get started. Don't wait!
CorelDraw (styled CorelDRAW) is a vector graphics editor developed and marketed by Corel Corporation. It is also the name of the Corel graphics suite, which includes the bitmap-image editor Corel Photo-Paint as well as other graphics-related programs (see below). The latest version is marketed as CorelDraw Graphics Suite 2019 (equivalent to version 21), and was released in 12 March, 2019. CorelDraw is designed to edit two-dimensional images such as logos and posters.
InDesign CC provides access to other Adobe resources. Many of these services within InDesign CC involve additional paid services, in which Adobe collects additional fees beyond the monthly license for the CC apps. These include Adobe Stock which, for additional fees, provides access to images. Similarly, fonts from Typekit are available for additional fees beyond the cost of InDesign.

Still, it takes just a couple of clicks to insert a JPEG, a GIF, a BMP, a PNG, or another image type. Click the graphic, and the Picture Tools Format tab lets you tweak the brightness, the color mode, and the contrast of a picture. You can also rotate it, crop it, skew its angle, add 3D effects and shadows to its borders, and convert it to all manner of shapes, such as a thought bubble, an arrow, or a star. Options for positioning an image and wrapping text around it are also front and center, which should be helpful for creating professional-looking business documents, as well as casual party invitations. You don't get nearly the amount of control offered by Microsoft Publisher, QuarkXPress, or Adobe InDesign, but Word 2007 may do the trick for ultrabasic desktop-publishing needs.
Personalized digital studio: With CorelDraw X7 you have total control over your workspace and design process. Both CorelDraw and Corel Photo-Paint offer different types of intuitive layouts for designers of all levels. Workspaces range from minimalistic (lite), to familiar (default) and even allow custom setups. This means you can spend more time creating instead of fiddling. Adobe users will be able to hit the ground running with the Photoshop- and Illustrator-friendly layouts.

Adobe developed InDesign CS3 (and Creative Suite 3) as universal binary software compatible with native Intel and PowerPC Macs in 2007, two years after the announced 2005 schedule, inconveniencing early adopters of Intel-based Macs. Adobe CEO Bruce Chizen had announced that "Adobe will be first with a complete line of universal applications".[5] The CS2 Mac version had code tightly integrated to the PPC architecture, and not natively compatible with the Intel processors in Apple's new machines, so porting the products to another platform was more difficult than had been anticipated. Adobe developed the CS3 application integrating Macromedia products (2005), rather than recompiling CS2 and simultaneously developing CS3.

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